Neighbors Unite at Boundary Block Party

By David Nyweide

Most of us think of our neighbors as being the people we see in Bolton Hill. We pass each other on our way to work, say hi while walking the dog, or chat at a coffee shop around the corner. We sometimes forget that Bolton Hill is part of a larger quilt of neighborhoods in Central West Baltimore. 

Just to the west across Eutaw Place, three neighborhoods—Marble Hill, Druid Heights, and Madison Park—encompass just about the same geographic area as Bolton Hill have housing stock of the same vintage, style, and proportions.

Why don’t we consider those west of us our neighbors? One reason is simple: because we infrequently interact with people who live on the other side of Eutaw Place. The less frequently we interact, the less likely for any relationship to develop, or even to start. 

So what stops us from interacting with each other?

The American Community Survey provides an illuminating portrait of the differences that hinder interaction between residents in Bolton Hill and other near-west neighborhoods. Based on demographic data from 2011-2015, the survey shows large and consistent disparities between Bolton Hill, Marble Hill and the combined neighborhoods of Druid Heights and Madison Park according to race, education level, household income, unemployment rates, rates of home ownership, home value and numbers of vacant properties.

American Community Survey chart
Chart adapted from the American Community Survey showing economic and racial disparities between Bolton Hill and other 21217 neighborhoods.

Although these neighborhoods are in the same area of the city, these differences show a pattern of separation that’s hard to break, especially since people tend to live where they resemble their neighbors. 

You can start to break the cycle by simply getting to know your neighbors to the west of Bolton Hill. The No Boundaries Coalition started with this purpose, providing opportunities to interact with neighbors who share the same interests in and desires for our corner of the city. We all want good schools for our children. Access to healthy, affordable food. Safe streets and police accountability.

If you share these interests, come and join your neighbors at the Boundary Block Party on Saturday, June 3. Hosted by the No Boundaries Coalition, in partnership with Jubilee Arts, the Boundary Block Party celebrates everything positive happening in Central West Baltimore.

No Boundaries meeting
No Boundaries Coalition meeting at St. Peter Claver Church.

If you’re interested in really getting to know more of your neighbors, attend a monthly No Boundaries Coalition meeting the second Tuesdays of the month at St. Peter Claver Church on Pennsylvania Avenue Triangle Park. You’ll meet people who live, work, or worship in this part of the city and are advocating together for strengthened safety, better fresh food access, more voting, and youth empowerment. 

Working on shared interests with residents from the full Central West Baltimore community reminds you that your neighbors are not limited to Bolton Hill alone.

Tenth Annual Boundary Block Party on June 3

2016's Boundary Block PartyCelebrate the community that unites us, rather than the boundaries that separate us, by joining the fun at the 10th Annual Boundary Block Party, Saturday June 3, from 1 to 4 pm at the Upton Triangle, the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and Presstman Street.

Organized by No Boundaries Coalition and Jubilee Arts, you can follow the event and RSVP on Facebook to show your support.

The Boundary Block Party brings together residents of Central West Baltimore as one community, including the neighborhoods of Bolton Hill, Marble Hill, Reservoir Hill, Upton, Sandtown, and Madison Park, and Druid Heights.

Started in 2008, the first Block Party was held on the Eutaw St. median south of McMechen, the unofficial but generally accepted boundary separating Bolton Hill from Madison Park and Marble Hill. From the start, the block party set out to encourage more open involvement between the whole 21217 community.

Boundary Block Party
Lively entertainment is guaranteed

Over the years, it has grown bigger and moved just a few blocks west to the Upton Triangle at the boundary of the Upton, Druid Heights and Sandtown-Winchester neighborhoods.

And the fun has grown too, with live entertainment, music to dance to, grilled food to eat, a community resource fair, and art activities for families. The live entertainment will include Twilighters Marching Band, Brown Memorial Choir, Soulful Sisters, and Dynamic Force, along with others.

Fresh on the Avenue will even be moving their store’s stalls to the park to setup a full outdoor produce market with a large selection of locally grown and organic items.

As they did last year, MRIA’s Social Action Task Force will be organizing a group walk from Bolton Hill over to the Party. This year, they’re meeting at Linden Gazebo at 9:45 am for a morning walk to join the clean up of Upton Park in preparation for the Block Party. Kids and adults welcome – just bring work gloves if you have them.

Plan to make a whole day of it, as Boltonstock 2017 starts afterward at 5 pm—the official after party.

SATF June Activities

MRIA’s Social Action Task Force encourage you to join them at several events in June.

On Friday, June 2 from 4–7 pm, a Stop Gun Violence Rally will be held at the Mondawmin Mall parking lot . This is part of the National Gun Violence Awareness Day, and organizers encourage everyone to show their support by wearing orange.

Then on Saturday morning, June 3, join the SATF for a park cleanup and a party.

They’ll be meeting at 9:45 am near the Linden gazebo (1700 block of Linden Ave.) and will make the 10-block stroll to Upton Triangle Park at Presstman St. and Pennsylvania Ave. There, they’ll join other volunteers for the first My Block My Hood cleanup of the summer in preparation for the Boundary Block Party. See the Facebook event for more information and to RSVP.

After the cleanup, stay for the fun at the Boundary Block Party from 1–4 pm, and then walk back to Bolton Hill’s Sumpter Park for Boltonstock from 5–10 pm.

At Boltonstock, remember to stop by the SATF table to donate money and/or copier paper for distribution to three neighborhood schools, Eutaw-Marshburn, Midtown Academy and Mt. Royal. This is the makeup for May’s Stoop Party, which was cancelled due to bad weather. Cash, credit card and check donations can be accepted at the booth. Please make checks payable to MRIA and put “SATF School Fund” in the memo.

Register for Summer Classes at Jubilee Arts

In the Studio at Jubilee Arts
Studio at Jubilee Arts

Since 2009, Jubilee Arts has been providing arts classes and more to the residents of the Sandtown-Winchester, Upton and surrounding neighborhoods in Baltimore, Maryland. Located on Pennsylvania Avenue, an area with a rich history of African-American culture, the organization is bringing the arts back to life in this west Baltimore community.

Through partnerships with area artists, writers, and dancers, including the Maryland Institute College of Art and Baltimore Clayworks, Jubilee Arts offers children’s, adult and multi-generational classes in dance, visual arts, creative writing and ceramics.

This year, Jubilee Arts offers the following summer classes. Click the links for more details. Register for classes here, and find specific schedule, dates, cost, class details here.

Youth age 6–11, 3:30–5:00 pm
Mondays: Ballet
Tuesdays: Fashion/Sewing
Wednesdays: Capoeira
Thursdays: Ceramics
Plus: Weekly Explore Bmore Field Trips Wednesday mornings

Youth age 13–18, 3–4:30 pm
Wednesdays: Portfolio Drawing

Adults, 6–7:30 pm
Mondays: Line Dance
Tuesdays: Sewing
Thursdays: Hand Dance

Seniors, 10 am–12:00 pm
Tuesdays: Creative Crafts
Wednesdays: Ceramics

Volunteers Needed

As Jubilee ramps up for summer classes, they are also looking for teaching assistants. Please consider volunteering for one of the Youth (age 6–11) classes, or to serve food from 4:30–5:30 pm Monday through Friday.

Plus for the Youth in Business program, they are looking for volunteers to accompany students to sales events on evenings and weekends, including support transporting inventory and supervision while they sell their art products around the city.

If interested, email volunteer coordinator Xanthe Key at volunteercoordinator@intersectionofchange.org.

Jubilee Arts is part of the larger community development work of Intersection Of Change (formerly Newborn Holistic Ministries).

Two Years After Baltimore Uprising, BYOP Cultivates New Leaders

BYOP on Pugh
BYOP member Diamon demanding accountability from Mayor Catherine Pugh. Photo courtesy of @UNBOUND_RCK.

By David Nyweide

Freddie Gray died two years ago, sparking demonstrations that came to be known as the Baltimore Uprising. What’s happened since?

Here’s just one example of positive change.

The Baltimore Youth Organizing Project (BYOP) was established in October 2015, born of a desire to empower youth in West Baltimore in the wake of the Baltimore Uprising. Through their involvement in BYOP, youth have learned the principles and techniques of community organizing, conducted a listening campaign to hear about issues important to their peers, ratified a youth city agenda, and organized forums with political candidates and elected officials.

BYOP is a collaboration between Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD) and the No Boundaries Coalition (NBC). Reverend Tim Hughes Williams at Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church helped launch BYOP, and the church provided starter funding for modest stipends for eight youths who attended regular meetings and met with more than 400 young people in the community. Rev. Hughes Williams continues to work with BYOP members along with Rebecca Nagle of NBC and Gwen Brown of BUILD. He’s also looking for opportunities for youth affiliated with Brown Memorial to become involved.

“It has been inspiring to work with young people who have an intuitive, firsthand understanding of how the city needs to change to meet the needs of its youth,” said Rev. Hughes Williams. “BYOP has been a vehicle to teach them to tell their stories powerfully and hold elected officials accountable for their decisions. After the Baltimore Uprising, this has felt like essential and satisfying work.”

The BYOP youth agenda was ratified at a meeting of almost 100 youth in January 2016. It advocates for funding from the city and public-private partnerships that would support after-school programming, recreation centers, and youth employment—all of which help keep youth off the streets and develop their potential to contribute to the life of the city.

In March 2016, BUILD hosted an Accountability Forum at Coppin State University to hear the mayoral candidates’ positions on the BUILD One Baltimore Agenda: a city for youth, a city for jobs, a city that is safe. BYOP was able to present its youth agenda as part of this event. Approximately 200 youth sat on stage with six of the mayoral candidates, and 600 adults sat in the audience. Every candidate, including our current mayor Catherine Pugh, committed to the BUILD One Baltimore Agenda.

At the end of 2016, BYOP graduated its first class of eight young people. Now headed by Samirah Franklin—a member of that first class—BYOP is one part of NBC’s work in Central West Baltimore.

In its second year of organizing, BYOP has focused on holding Mayor Pugh accountable to her promises as a candidate. On April 4, 2017, Trinity Baptist Church (at McMechen and McCulloh) hosted about 150 adults and youth to hear the BYOP youth publicly ask Mayor Pugh for two specific commitments:

  1. Create 250 year-round youth jobs within the city and the corporate community in her first year in office; and
  2. Maintain current levels of funding for afterschool and community school programs in the 2018 budget.

The mayor agreed to help create 250 new year-round jobs for youth, but equivocated about after-school funding. In fact, her preliminary 2018 city budget cut afterschool and community school funding by 25 percent, or roughly $2.4 million.

BYOP is now fighting to restore the funding, with the help of BUILD, NBC, and the Child First Authority. They are calling on both the Mayor and City Council to acknowledge the cut and restore the funds.

“In the aftermath of our city burning, Baltimore’s elected officials made a promise to us, the youth of the city,” explained BYOP’s Lead Youth Organizer Franklin. “It’s only been two years, and we are cut. We call on the Mayor and City Council to keep their promise to us and restore afterschool and community school funding to its current level of $9.2 million.” 

BYOP also plans to continue listening to residents and providing youth workshops on community organizing. These activities help develop the voice and power of more and more youth to hold their elected officials accountable and effect the changes they desire in their communities.

To find out how you can support the young people of BYOP and their efforts to build power for Baltimore City youth, contact Samirah Franklin at samirahfranklin@gmail.com

Memorial Episcopal Walks on Good Friday to Repent Racism

By Rev. Grey Maggiano

Plans for Unveiling
Daughters of the Confederacy Announces Program
April 24th, 1903

Mrs. D. Giraud Wright (1632 Park Ave.), President of the Maryland Daughters, announced
at social meeting of the Baltimore Chapter …The Strains of Dixie will mark the formal
opening of the program, and following this the invocation by the Rev. William M.
Dame (Rector, Memorial Episcopal Church), Chaplain of the Maryland Daughters
of the Confederacy.”

Station 2: site of the former segregated Bolton St. Recreation Center
Participants visit the former site of the segregated Bolton St. Recreation Center, Station 2 on the Repenting for Racism walk.

Almost 114 years ago to the day, most of Bolton Hill—some 700 people stood on the stage alone!— turned out for the dedication of the Daughters of the Confederacy Monument on Mt. Royal Avenue. Leading the proceedings were the then-Rector of Memorial Episcopal Church and the President of the Daughters of the Confederacy, a longtime Park Ave. resident.

This monument was one of the fourteen stops on Memorial Church’s Repenting for Racism: Stations of the Cross Walk last month, which was held on Good Friday.

After a long period of research and truth-telling, Memorial Members selected fourteen sites around the neighborhood that call attention to both our parish’s and our neighborhood’s legacy of racism. These included:

  • The former site of the segregated Bolton Hill Recreation Center on the east side of the 1300 block of Bolton Street;
  • 1212 Bolton Street, which was purchased by a black Baptist pastor who was forcibly evicted by unhappy neighbors; and
  • Memorial Church’s own parish hall, in which blackface minstrel shows were staged to entertain the neighborhood for many years.
Stations of the Cross walk
Visiting the “stations of the cross” of Bolton Hill’s past, April 14, 2017.

When people ask me why we need to do these kinds of things— why we need to “drudge up” this ugly history, and remind ourselves of the painful past— I point to stories like this. Or I tell of the strong neighborhood activism supporting segregated housing, or my ancestor’s letter to the editor urging the restriction of the right to vote for “the Negroe.” 

We need to do these kinds of things because they are not ancient history. They didn’t just happen before the Civil War, or in the 1800s, but in the mid-twentieth century. Current parishioners and neighbors were alive when many of these events took place. And, though most Bolton Hill residents didn’t live here then, there are many, many neighbors, churches and institutions across Eutaw Place who do remember.

The reality is that we have asymmetrical access to information and asymmetrical notions of history. While Bolton Hillers celebrate the very diverse, very inclusive neighborhood we see between Mt. Royal and Eutaw, and Dolphin and North Ave., neighbors on the other sides of these boundaries remember a not-too-distant past when to walk through Bolton Hill as a person of color guaranteed a visit from the police. 

Perhaps you, like me, have asked why Bolton Hill retains its reputation as a predominantly white, wealthy neighborhood when the actual numbers suggest it is much more economically and racially diverse? Or why your institution or organization, like our church, has trouble developing relationships with organizations west of Eutaw Place? Or perhaps you have wondered why urban renewal, redlining, and segregation didn’t have the same effect in Bolton Hill as it did in Reservoir Hill, Upton, or Penn North?

Memorial Church’s research shows that the answer to all of these questions lies in our own history.

They say that those who don’t know their history are doomed to repeat it. Whether or not that is true in this case, our lack of knowledge of the past makes it very hard to dialogue with those who continue to feel its impact.

We hope that by bringing these truths to light, we can help all of our neighbors, black and white, rich and poor, longtime residents and new arrivals, to understand both the problematic history of these few city blocks, and to band together to set out a different future— for our Church, for our neighborhood, and perhaps for our whole city.

For more information please visit Memorial Episcopal online, and see this related article about the Repenting Racism walk in the Washington Post.

Stoop Party for the Schools on May 13

Stoop Party for schools5/12/17 – Due to the prediction of really lousy weather on Saturday, the Social Action Task Force has sadly decided to cancel this year’s Stoop Party with a Purpose. Please help us spread the word so that our friends do not brave the rain for nothing.

We encourage neighbors to bring donations to Boltonstock on June 3, and drop them off at the SATF table. Cash, credit card and check donations can be accepted at the booth. Please make checks payable to “MRIA”, and put “SATF School Fund” in the memo.

We all like a good party. And we all like to do good. The SATF’s Parties with a Purpose combine these to double the fun.

Get your share of double delight by coming out for this year’s first Stoop Party with a Purpose on Saturday, May 13, 11 am to 1 pm, at the Gazebo in the 1700 block of Linden Avenue (between Sav-a-Lot and Sumpter Park). RSVP on Facebook.

Mingle with your neighbors while enjoying wine, beer, soft drinks, and the ever-popular Bloody Mary Bar. The event is free, but donations are encouraged. 100% of all donations go to support our neighborhood schools as they face a critical budget deficit.

Linden Gazebo
Linden St. gazebo.

Donations will be shared among three schools: Eutaw-Marshburn Elementary, Mt. Royal Elementary/Middle, and Midtown Academy. Each school has selected a special program that will be supported by the donations. Midtown, for example, will use the funds to support their CREW morning sharing and learning activity for students in grades 6-8.

Organizers suggest a donation of at least $10/person or a ream of paper. (Or both!) Believe it or not, paper supplies cost each school about $10,000 per year. The goal is to build a paper tower by the gazebo.

Representatives from all three schools will be on hand to talk about their programs, along with Karen DeCamp, Baltimore Education Coalition’s Director of Neighborhood Programs. She will update partygoers on BEC’s efforts to find longterm solutions for school funding.

“Facing Change”: MICA Exhibit Examines Development’s Effects on East Baltimore

MICA and AlternateROOTS, an arts activism organization based in Atlanta, present “Facing Change: Portraits and Narratives of the Shifting Cultural Landscape in East Baltimore,” a special pop-up exhibition by MFA Community Arts student Ben Hamburger.

Sponsored by the college’s Office of Community Engagement and Day at the Market, a community outreach program based at the Johns Hopkins East Baltimore campus, the exhibition will be on view at the historic Northeast Market, 2101 E. Monument St., on Saturday, April 1 and Wednesday, April 5 from 10 am–2:30 pm, as well as at “Grad Show III” at MICA’s Decker Gallery, 1303 W. Mt. Royal Ave., on Friday, April 21, 5–8 pm.

The exhibition is a socially engaged art project that brings together different perspectives on the contentious issue of community development in East Baltimore, and aims to confront the difficult realities of rapid urban development and raise awareness about a range of impacts on diverse stakeholders.

Hamburger’s portraits use salvaged formstone debris and audio narratives to honor residents of the community and share their stories about the area’s past, present and future. Their stories provoke viewers to think critically about the sense of place, home and the meaning of development.

Listen online to stories from community members featured in the exhibition.

A painter, socially engaged artist and educator from Silver Spring, Ben Hamburger is currently completing his M.F.A. in Community Arts at MICA. This project is a component of his thesis work.

St. Francis Neighborhood Center Embarks on Major Capital Campaign

By Morganne Ruhnke, Development and Event Coordinator at St. Francis Neighborhood Center

Did you know that more than 1,200 children in the Reservoir Hill area live in poverty? St. Francis Neighborhood Center (SFNC) is responding to this need with educational and enrichment programs to uplift children and their families—making more than 40,000 individual contacts with Reservoir Hill residents every year.

Reservoir Hill kids on honor roll
Smiles of Success

 

SFNC is a community-based, non-profit organization committed to ending generational poverty through education, inspiring self-esteem, self-improvement, and strengthening connections to the community. It was founded in 1963 as an outreach center for two local churches, and is the oldest enrichment center of its kind in Baltimore City. SFNC founder Father Tom Composto was a Jesuit priest who moved into the facility in the 1960s. He stayed there for the remainder of his life, devoting himself to the poor.  

Father Tom, also known as the Pope of Whitelock Street, would stand at the corner of Whitelock and Linden and challenge drug dealers to do something better with their lives. After he passed away in 2010, SFNC Board and staff have carried on his passion and vision, with programs and projects that serve the community that Father Tom so dearly loved.

The Center offers a computer lab and a community library that is free of charge to the neighborhood. They offer adult literacy and job readiness programs. They hold community yoga sessions on Wednesday evenings, and Narcotics Anonymous meets there three evenings a week. Every Monday, friends from Corpus Christi Church distribute free groceries to anyone who lives in the 21217 area. Many other partner groups use the Center for their meetings and also provide services that benefit the community.

SFNC’s award-winning flagship programs for youth have received national recognition. The Power Project is a free after-school program, with fifty “prodigies”—youth—currently enrolled. The Summer of Service Excursion (SOSE) is held for eight weeks from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm during the summer months and is the longest running summer program in the City. SOSE participants focus on topics including education, art, STEM, and character building.

Ethan's poem
Poem describing the “St. Francis Way.”

Every summer, the Center coordinates with its many longstanding partners to host the day-long Reservoir Hill Resource Fair & Festival at the corner of Whitelock and Linden. The festival brings together this vibrant, diverse community and features a grocery and bookbag giveaway, food trucks, local art, and live music. Save the date for Saturday, August 5, 2017—and if you are interested in getting involved as a vendor, volunteer, or supporter, contact Morganne Ruhnke at mruhnke@stfranciscenter.org.

St. Francis Neighborhood Center
Consider donating so that even more children can join the fun

The Center is currently embarking on a major capital campaign, “Count on Me.” This community-driven campaign addresses the pressing need to serve more children. More than 30 kids are already on the waiting list for the youth programs, and with the merger of Westside Elementary and John Eager Howard School, the number of children in need will soon triple. We want them all to have a positive place to attend educational and enrichment activities after school and are excited about our plans for growth. To learn more, contact Angela Wheeler at awheeler@stfranciscenter.org.

SFNC occupies a historic, four-story townhouse, and while we love our location, we are limited in our ability to serve more children and to provide programming to fulfill ever-evolving community needs. Our total goal is to raise $4 million in two years to add classrooms, an art studio, a kitchen/cafe, greening projects, multipurpose space, and expand our media lab and library. Once complete, we expect to serve more than 200 children in our education programs, an 100% increase in capacity.

We invite you to be a part of this transformational change. Can we count on you to join us in achieving this milestone for Reservoir Hill and West Baltimore?

How you can you help:

  • Donations of all sizes are greatly appreciated and help us get one step closer to serve more of the community.  To donate and learn more about the center check out our website at www.stfranciscenter.org.
  • We are always looking for people to host fundraisers, serve as mentors and tutors, and help us with special events and daily operations.  To get involved, please contact us at volunteer@stfranciscenter.org.

Find out more on the St. Francis Neighborhood Center website.

Tri-Church Education Series Asks You to Listen in Lent

Listening with the heartAs in years past, three neighborhood churches – Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church, Memorial Episcopal Church and Corpus Christi Catholic Church – will jointly sponsor the Bolton Hill Tri-Church Education Series.

During the Lenten season, the series features topics of interest to the church congregations and the broader community.

This year’s series, “Listening in Lent,” is especially timely. Speakers from some of the Baltimore communities most affected by recent political changes will be invited to address the group. They will consider this question: “In light of the current political environment, what response would you like to see from the Christian community?” Each session will have time for questions and group discussion.

Guest speakers will include members of the predominantly African-American Community of West Baltimore, represented by the No Boundaries Coalition (3/8), the immigrant and refugee community (3/22), the Jewish community (3/29), and the Islamic community (4/5).

By forming connections and learning from these groups, our community can better provide the appropriate and needed responses demanded by our current situation. The series is open to anyone interested in making Baltimore a more dynamic and inclusive place.

The Series will be held on four Wednesdays, March 8, March 22, March 29, and April 5. Each session will begin with a light supper at 6:30 pm, followed by the education portion at 7 pm. The series takes place in the Education Building at Brown Memorial.

Black History Party with a Purpose

Join MRIA’s Social Action Task Force for an afternoon of conversation and profundity related to Black History topics at 2017’s first Party with a Purpose, Sunday, February 26, 2–5 pm at 1308 Bolton Street.

In celebration of this year’s theme for Black History Month, The Crisis in Black Education, the Party’s donations will go to two neighborhood youth groups, St. Francis Neighborhood Center and the Kids Safe Zone.

Everyone is asked to please bring 1) wine or other beverage to share, 2) a donation ($10 suggested) that will go to the featured organizations, and 3) a reading, poem, or quote from a black author. There will be tastings of green Creole gumbo with rice and cornbread, as well as other food, and you are welcome to bring your own tasty contribution to the table.

Cultural historian, music critic and neighbor Don Palmer will kick off the event with a short talk. Then, attendees will read their selection and ask listeners to guess who the author is. Reading selections will be available for those who don’t bring one, but still want to participate.

To set the tone for the party, Don will curate a music playlist, and the featured organizations will be on hand to make short presentations.

Thanks to the SATF Planning Team for organizing this event, Kendra Parlock, Michael Booth and Don Palmer.

Honor Black History Month by Feeding Your Brain

By Peter Van Buren

With its origins dating back over a hundred years, February has been officially declared Black History Month by every U.S. president since President Ford in 1976.

The theme of Black History Month changes yearly. This year’s theme is The Crisis in Black Education. We need not look any further than Baltimore’s own schools to witness this crisis. But, where do we start in solving it?

Why not start by educating yourself? Here are a few ideas to consider for your education program. 

  • Volunteer at one of our neighborhood schools. Consult the Youth/Schools section of Bolton Hill’s Community Asset List to see where you might be needed. The children love having visitors, even if you just go once. You might find that once is not enough.
  • Attend this month’s Party with a Purpose organized by the Social Action Task Force, where guests will be asked to read a passage from a black author of their choosing. Donations raised at the party will support local youth organizations. The Party with a Purpose takes place Sunday, Feb. 26 from 2-5 pm at 1308 Bolton Street; more details here.
  • Lillie Carroll Jackson

    Learn about Lillie CarrolJackson, renowned civil rights activist who lived at 1320 Eutaw Place. To honor her legacy, Morgan State University completed a major renovation of her beautiful home in 2012, transforming it into the state-of-the-art the Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum. Unfortunately, due to the lack of funds to support its administration, the museum remains closed except by appointment (email LCJmuseum@morgan.edu or call 443-885-3895 if you’d like to visit).

    You can help make this valuable educational resource available to regular visitors by writing a check payable to the Morgan State University Foundation (note “Lillie Carroll Jackson Museum” in the memo line), and send to Mr. Gabriel Tenabe, James E. Lewis Museum, 1700 E. Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore, MD 21251.

  • Be inspired by the courageous and groundbreaking legacy of the many other famous black residents of the 21217 neighborhood by walking the Pennsylvania Avenue Heritage Trail, whose 2 mile path winds from the State Center to the Upton Metro. Brochures for the Trail (and delicious baked goods) are available at The Avenue Bakery, 2229 Pennsylvania Avenue. You can also take an audiovisual tour of Pennsylvania Avenue using the izi.Travel app or on your computer.
  • Expand your musical knowledge by listening to a black artist that’s new to you. Amazing black musicians are too numerous to count, but one I recommend is Gil Scott Heron. Try his hard-hitting The Revolution Will Not Be Televised, or the beautiful, but painfully sad Winter in America. Or if you want to go farther back, check out izi.Travel’s Eubie Blake’s Ragtime Riffs musical tour. 
  • Celebrate the rich contributions of black poets to American poetry by contemplating Twelve Poems at the Academy of American Poets website. Twelve contemporary black poets from across the country chose one poem each that should be read this month and then explain why.
  • Start down the path to social justice by learning about the critically important concept of white privilege. I’m learning a lot from Waking up White, by Debby Irving, while next up on my reading list is the National Book Award winner Between the World and Me, by West Baltimore native Ta-Nehisi Coates. 
  • Learn about the separate but unequal legacy of Plessy vs. Ferguson and Brown v. Board of Education by reading Jonathan Kozol’s Savage Inequalities: Children in America’s Schools.

Knowledge is power and it’s also cathartic. We welcome your suggestions about other ways to learn about black history or the crisis in black education. Leave a reply or comment below, or email us at bhbeditor@gmail.com.

SATF Potluck with a Purpose and Plans for 2017

On Sunday, December 11, MRIA’s Social Action Task Force (SATF) organized a Potluck Party with a Purpose. In the aftermath of this year’s divisive elections, the SATF thought more neighbors might want to get involved in their community-building efforts.

Over 30 attended the meeting with dishes in hand. SATF reviewed the group’s accomplishments and looked forward to projects planned for 2017.

SATF Potluck, December 2016
People attending the SATF Potluck in December review the group’s accomplishments in 2016.

SATF members explained the group’s establishment by MRIA in the wake of the unrest in spring 2015. Following those events, neighbors wanted to find ways that residents could make a positive impact in the 21217 community.

At that time, they developed the following mission statement: “To encourage, facilitate, and initiate personal engagement between the Bolton Hill neighborhood and the surrounding 21217 community. By highlighting the many great organizations serving our community, we hope that our collective efforts will create a more healthy, vibrant, just, and safe community for everyone.”

The group decided to focus their efforts on supporting existing organizations in the neighborhood, rather than setting their own agenda. They chose three methods for supporting these organizations:

  1. Organizing Parties with a Purpose
  2. Creating and promoting a Community Asset List to facilitate and encourage more neighborhood involvement
  3. Organizing neighborhood efforts to actively support organizations  

Thus far, the SATF has organized five Parties with a Purpose, as well as a book drive for Reading Partners and a Stoop Party group walk to the No Boundaries Block Party last June. They also published the Community Asset List on the Bolton Hill Bulletin website and published a Holiday Volunteer Guide to encourage neighbors to volunteer for local organizations during the holidays.

SATF events have collected approximately $2,000 in donations and have funneled volunteers and other support to twelve non-profit organizations serving the 21217 area. This Powerpoint slideshow provides an overview of the SATF’s impact thus far.

Potluck attendees went on to discuss plans for 2017, coming up with many creative suggestions. The SATF collected these Potluck Wall Responses to a series of questions that were posted around the meeting room.

The SATF encourages everyone to get involved by attending one of their monthly meetings or their next Party with a Purpose. If you’d rather donate money or have volunteer time, review the Community Asset List and Holiday Volunteer Guide for ideas.

The next SATF meeting is scheduled for Sunday, January 8, 5 pm at 1309 Bolton St. (Kellie’s & Rob’s house.) On the agenda: planning the next Party with a Purpose, slated for sometime this winter.

SATF Potluck with a Purpose

Decorating Pumpkins at October's Halloween fest
Decorating Pumpkins at October’s Halloween fest

Got the post election blues? Want to join your neighbors in accomplishing projects that will help our community?

Then join the party at the next Social Action Task Force event – a Potluck with a Purpose on Sunday, December 11 from 6 to 8 pm in the Upper Parish Hall of Memorial Episcopal Church (enter on the Lafayette St. side).

Please bring something to share, both food and wine or other beverages.

The group will first review their mission with MRIA and the work that’s been completed in 2016 as preparation for the main focus of the meeting – discussing the SATF’s goals and plans for 2017.

Potluck with a Purpose on Dec. 11

The monthly meetings of MRIA’s Social Action Task Force are always open to everyone, but in the aftermath of this year’s divisive elections, the SATF is encouraging all interested neighbors to attend their December meeting on Sunday, December 11, 6 to 8 pm.

It’s a Potluck Party with a Purpose, so please bring something to share—something to eat and wine or another beverage.

SATF cleanup of vacant lot last summer
SATF cleans up a vacant lot last summer.

 

Andrew Parlock painting a building across from the lot
Andrew Parlock paints a building across from the lot.

The potluck will be in Upper Parish Hall at Memorial Episcopal (enter from the Lafayette Street side). SATF will recap this year’s accomplishments, review its mission, and discuss goals and projects for 2017.

Many nonprofit organizations serving the 21217 neighborhood will be on hand to provide their input on how Bolton Hill’s efforts can best complement their work.

Get involved in your community. Together we can make a difference.

Read about the success of SATF’s fall event, the Halloween Pumpkin Fest.

New Life for Historic Marble Hill Community

Booker T. Washington School
Booker T. Washington School in Marble Hill.

by Marti Pitrelli

Under the direction of new president Atiba Nkurmah, the Marble Hill Community Association’s goals are to increase homeownership, attract investment, stabilize historic structures, decrease criminal activity and student truancy, and generally support neighborhood residents.

Several public middle and high schools are located in Marble Hill, which lies just west of Bolton Hill, on the west side of Eutaw Place. Decreasing student truancy will no doubt have a positive effect on decreasing adolescent crimes in both Marble Hill and Bolton Hill.

The Marble HIll Historic District was once the home of the African American elite of Baltimore. Unlike large areas of Bolton Hill that were demolished, Marble Hill survived the urban renewal of the1970s largely intact. Many beautiful buildings remain, including schools, churches, and continuous rows of grand houses.

One of Marble Hill’s architectural gems, the impressive Richardson Romanesque-style Booker T. Washington School, on the National Register of Historic Places, just received 200 new, custom-made Marvin windows. Come by and take a look at this enormous brick and marble structure and its beautiful new windows!

To name just a few of the neighborhood’s illustrious residents, prominent figures in the Civil Rights Movement such as Thurgood Marshall and Clarence and Juanita Jackson Mitchell, John Murphy (founder of the Afro-American newspaper), Harry S. Cummings (first African American Baltimore City Councilman and one of the first two African Americans to graduate from the University of Maryland Law School), Henry Hall (founder of the National Aquarium in Baltimore) Cab Calloway, and Billie Holiday all resided in Marble Hill.

Douglas Memorial Community Church, built in 1857 suffers neglect
Built in 1857, Douglas Memorial Community Church is one of Marble Hill’s many architectural gems.

Unfortunately, disinvestment in recent decades has caused many of the buildings to fall into a state of vacancy and disrepair.

Marble Hill is working closely with the City of Baltimore and Baltimore Heritage to identify historic rowhouses to save them from demolition and to stabilize them where necessary. The properties are then put into the hands of responsible owners who will restore them to their former glory. This enormous task requires close coordination between the city legal department, code enforcement, financing departments, tax lien departments and stabilization crews.

Marble Hill Community Association has appointed a new Architectural Review Committee (ARC) chairperson who will oversee these preservation efforts. After many years of service, the former ARC Chair Marion Blackwell has stepped down, and Marti Pitrelli will serve as the new chair of the ARC.

The ARC will continue working to expand the current Marble Hill Historic District to include all streets of Marble Hill, an effort projected to take 1-2 years.

They will also continue efforts to attain landmark designation for the A.M.E. Bishops’ Headquarters/King-Briscoe House located at 1232 Druid Hill Avenue. This structure was the first building in the city of Baltimore to utilize CHAP’s new Potential Landmark Provision, which temporarily protects a building until it can be properly researched and designated as a “historic landmark.”

This new provision was used to protect the building from demolition, following the widely publicized demise of its “sister house,” the Lillie Carroll Jackson Freedom House at 1234 Druid Hill Avenue. The Freedom House was demolished against Lillie Carroll Jackson’s wishes, without community input or CHAP review, in October 2015.

A series of hearings this year resulted in CHAP’s unanimous support of preservation of 1232 Druid Hill Avenue, and they ordered owners to stabilize the crumbling structure. Our District 11 Councilman, Eric Costello, will ask the Baltimore City Council to finalize the landmarking on December 8 at City Hall.

Fire damaged Thurgood Marshall Elementary School
Thurgood Marshall School was damaged by fire this summer.

The National Park Service has plans to resurrect the Thurgood Marshall School (PS 103) on Division Street, after it suffered a devastating fire earlier this year. And the grand and historic Home of the Friendless, at 1313 Druid Hill Avenue, has been sold by the City to a developer who plans to create artist housing and studios. This building was also used as Baltimore City’s first African American Public Health Center in more recent times. It is on the National Register of Historic Places, and we are very grateful to the City for selling it to a local developer for adaptive reuse as The House of ART.

Landscaping has transformed the newly restored Henry Highland Garnet Park at Druid Hill and W. Lafayette. The beautiful design includes planting beds, winding pathways and new park benches, and three large 20th-century iron urns which have been returned to the park. Since its renovation, the park has become a favorite gathering place for community events.

Over 200 new trees and tree wells have been planted in Marble Hill and Madison Park with the help of Parks and People, the Baltimore Tree Trust, and many community volunteers.

Baltimore Heritage tour group in front of demolished Freedom House
Baltimore Heritage tour group in front of demolished Freedom House.

Marble Hill, as well as parts of Eutaw Place, are included in the National Park Service’s new Civil Rights Heritage District as well as the Pennsylvania Avenue Heritage Trail. Sold-out historic tours of Marble Hill were conducted by Eli Pousson of Baltimore Heritage this year, and starting in spring 2017, Baltimore Heritage and Marti Pitrelli plan to continue tours of the neighborhood. Tour dates and other events will be announced in the Bulletin.

Please walk over and see the progress being made in Marble Hill, and all the wonderful buildings and parks it contains. Witness for yourself the resurrection of Bolton Hill’s neighbor to the west.

Ugly Pumpkin Party a Smashing Success

pumkin-party-31

It’s true. Bolton Hill does know how to throw a party.

MRIA’s Social Action Task Force (SATF) proved this again with a laughter-filled afternoon of Halloween fun on the warm, sunny Saturday of October 29. Check out the evidence in the slideshow below.

Due to the generosity of sponsor Kappa Alpha Psi, the Ugly Pumpkin Halloween Fest took place in the vacant lot next to the fraternity’s Youth and Community Center at 1207 Eutaw Place. Halloween-themed rock and roll pumped up the volume, as over 120 candy-fueled kids (plus quite a few adults) decorated pumpkins and experimented with a huge array of donated costumes.

Youths from Kappa's Guide Right Program
Youths from Kappa’s Guide Right Program

Young men from the Kappa League’s Guide Right mentor program, MICA art students and many other SATF volunteers made light work of the setup, running and take down of the party. Former mayor Shelia Dixon even stopped by on her way to another campaign event.

In the end, all of the pumpkins and most of the costumes found their way home with happy partygoers. Best of all, everything was free, thanks to donations from many neighbors.

The afternoon kids’ party was the first half of SATF’s fall Party with a Purpose program. In the evening, adults attended Memorial Episcopal’s Gala 2016 (see details here), which was indeed a most hideous event, and included a highly successful live auction.

Proceeds from the SATF’s Parties with a Purpose benefit non-profit groups that serve the 21217 area. The success of Memorial’s Gala, and the church’s generosity, allowed $315 to be donated to each of the four selected youth organizations that were part of the Halloween Fest, Jubilee Arts, Wide Angle Youth Media, Child First, and the Kappa League Guide Right Program.

Thanks to everyone who made this fun event a big success – so much so that discussions have already started for the second annual Pumpkin Party in 2017.

Help the Samaritans Support People Like Erika

Erika and her children
Erika and her children

Erika is a hard worker who needed help to get herself and her three young sons into an apartment, and on the right track. Just a few months ago, she had a low-paying job and, along with her children, had to sleep on sofas of different friends. So when Erika heard about Samaritan Community, she came to them as a last hope.

Through their new Housing Stability Pilot Program, they helped Erika pay for a security deposit for a safe, clean apartment for her family, which is near her two older sons’ school and right next door to her youngest son’s daycare. Samaritan also helped Erika by providing fresh groceries and a bus pass that enables her to get to a new, better-paying job.

“I was able to land this much better job because of the stability 
of having an apartment for my family. It’s almost impossible to keep a job when you don’t have a car and you are moving constantly,” Erika says. “In no time, Sharon became like a second mother to me. She saw the best in me and my boys, and wanted us to succeed as much as we did. That meant everything to us!”

Erika’s story, and so many others, are made possible by generosity of Samaritan’s supporters.

For our neighbors living in crisis, The Samaritan Community provides basic necessities and much more. They work continuously to expand the depth and breadth of their services to make the biggest possible impact on their members’ lives. During the past year, they

  • Helped members facing multiple, complex challenges through the Farnham-Krieger Endowment Fund.
  • Established a Housing Stability Pilot Program, helping more families keep a roof over their heads.
  • Created a computer workroom, enabling members to do job searches, school work, and more.
  • Distributed over 7,000 bags of healthy groceries, provided 1,200 hours in individual and group support, and gave more than $25,000 in emergency financial assistance.

Please consider donating to The Samaritan Community this season. A gift of $500 will keep the heat on this winter for a family of five, while a gift of $100 will feed a parent and child for a month.

Support for Our Neighborhood Farm

Canning workshop at WhiteLock Community Farm
Canning workshop at Whitelock Community Farm.

As the growing season ends, Whitelock Community Farm in Reservoir Hill finishes off another busy year. Their 2016 accomplishments include:

  • Growing 5,000 pounds of organic produce that was sold to neighbors through 60 Saturday farm stands and mobile markets.
  • Diverting 2,400 gallons of food scraps from the landfill through their community composting program, while producing nutrient-rich organic “fertilizer” to replenish the farm’s soil.
  • Providing job training for six local youths through their summer internship program.
  • Engaging the local community in farming and healthy outdoor work through 30 volunteer days.
  • Organizing and hosting four community workshops, five neighborhood potlucks, three movie nights and their annual Harvest Festival.

These numbers only tell part of the story. The farm helps make the 21217 neighborhood stronger and more vibrant by building bridges across racial and socio-economic barriers through the simple joys of good, healthy food and positive community activity.

 

Learning about composting
Learning about composting at Whitelock Farm.

In this season of giving, we encourage you to help their efforts. Please consider donating to their annual fundraising campaign—even $5 goes a long way. And spread the word to others who might be interested in supporting our neighborhood farm.

Read more about Whitelock Community Farm in this Bulletin article from May 2016.

New Guide Promotes Holiday Volunteering

givingAs we round the corner and head into the last months of the year, our thoughts often turn to giving – giving thanks, and giving to others.

To help neighbors with their philanthropic efforts, MRIA’s Social Action Task Force (SATF) has produced a Holiday Volunteer Guide that features over a dozen organizations that serve the 21217 zip code. Many of these organizations have been featured at one of the SATF’s Parties with a Purpose.

The mission of Bolton Hill’s Social Action Task Force is to encourage, facilitate, and initiate personal engagement between the Bolton Hill neighborhood and the larger 21217 community. By highlighting the many great organizations serving our area, they hope to strengthen and increase our collective efforts, creating a more healthy, vibrant, just, and safe neighborhood for all.

The guide contains information about charitable events and volunteer opportunities with local non-profits during the holiday season. In this year’s season of giving, the SATF encourages you to consider supporting organizations that work within the 21217 community, and spread cheer to neighbors in need.

View and download the 2017 Holiday Volunteer Guide.